“Crypto Currency Bubble +Cryptocurrency Mining Rig”

On March 25, 2014, the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) ruled that bitcoin will be treated as property for tax purposes. This means bitcoin will be subject to capital gains tax.[44] In a paper published by researchers from Oxford and Warwick, it was shown that bitcoin has some characteristics more like the precious metals market than traditional currencies, hence in agreement with the IRS decision even if based on different reasons.[45]

Years of regulation have stifled tech development in medical data management, while an array incompatible back-end systems and fragmented data trails limit patients’ ability to engage with their medical history. We have developed MedRec, an open-source program that applies blockchain smart contracts to create a decentralized content-management system for healthcare data, and have piloted the project with Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center. MedRec sets up an authentication log to govern medical record access, while providing means for auditability and data sharing. Its modular design integrates with providers’ existing, local data storage solutions, enabling interoperability. The system engages directly with medical researchers, who provide the “mining” needed to secure and sustain the authentication log on a private, Ethereum network. Read the whitepaper here.

One of the things that sets the New Economy Movement (NEM) apart is its “Proof of Importance” (PoI) algorithm. Unlike PoW, which requires miners to use significant processing power to get new coins, or PoS, which requires users to already own a certain amount of coins in order to get new ones, PoI actually encourages users to spend their coins. The PoI algorithm tracks a user’s transactions to determine how important that user is to the overall NEM economy.

A mining hardware such as a computer ASIC chip is essential when mining cryptocurrency. A mining software with a step-by-step guide is also ideal. The guide should explain in detail how the ASIC chip computer mining hardware works. A bitcoin wallet is used to store one’s bitcoins in case they complete a block successfully.

To give you an idea of just how powerful these machines are, a mining rig running 4 GPU’s would get a hash rate of around 3.4 MH/s and consume 3600kW/h while an ASIC machine can mine 6 TH/s and consume 2200kW/h. This effectively killed GPU mining and left many individuals worried about the security of the network. With less individuals being able to profitably mine from their home computer, the network become less decentralized. Scrypt mining was implemented with the promise of being ASIC resistant due to the memory problem it introduced.

Before they become such an alternative, though, the system will have to overcome a major, and surprising, problem: people have come to see it primarily as a way to make money. In other words, instead of being used as a currency, bitcoins are today mostly seen as (and traded as) an investment. There’s a good reason for that: as people learned about Bitcoin, the value of bitcoins, in dollar terms, skyrocketed. In July 2010, after the website Slashdot ran an item that introduced the currency to the public (or at least the public enthusiastic about new technologies), the value of bitcoins jumped tenfold in five days. Over the next eight months, the value rose tenfold again. This attracted an enormous amount of publicity. More important, it also made people think that buying and holding bitcoins was an easy way to make a buck. As a result, many—probably most—Bitcoin users are acquiring bitcoins not in order to buy goods and services but to speculate. That’s a bad investment decision, and it also hurts Bitcoin’s prospects.

Today, bitcoins can be used online to purchase beef jerky and socks made from alpaca wool. Some computer retailers accept them, and you can use them to buy falafel from a restaurant in Hell’s Kitchen. In late August, I learned that bitcoins could also get me a room at a Howard Johnson hotel in Fullerton, California, ten minutes from Disneyland. I booked a reservation for my four-year-old daughter and me and received an e-mail from the hotel requesting a payment of 10.305 bitcoins.

However, the country has also faced its fair share of problems when it comes to hacking scandals and crypto fraud. For example, the first crypto exchange that was set up within the island nation in 2010 was hacked within a year of its inception.

Cryptocurrency mining power is rated on a scale of hashes per seconds. A rig with a computing power of 1kH/s is mining at a rate of 1,000 hashes a second, 1MH/s is a million hashes per second and a GH/s is one billion hashes per second. Every time a miner successfully solves a block, a new hash is created. A hash algorithm turns this large amount of data into a fixed-length hash. Like a code if you know the algorithm you can solve a hash and get the original data out, but to the ordinary eye it’s just a bunch of numbers crammed together and remains practically impossible to get the original data out of.

A bitcoin doesn’t really exist as a concrete physical – or even digital – object. If I have 0.5 bitcoins sitting in my digital wallet, that doesn’t mean there is a corresponding other half sitting somewhere else.

Every transaction is a file that consists of the sender’s and recipient’s public keys (wallet addresses) and the amount of coins transferred. The transaction also needs to be signed off by the sender with their private key. All of this is just basic cryptography. Eventually, the transaction is broadcasted in the network, but it needs to be confirmed first.

The Reality Shares Nasdaq NextGen Economy ETF (ticker: BLCN) and the Amplify Transformational Data Sharing ETF (BLOK) are two new ETFs that invest in companies researching and developing the blockchain technology that underlies bitcoin and other popular cryptocurrencies.

Matt Mitchell, a tech security researcher, says that while lax security is a big risk, there are some exchanges that have invested in technology to lock down their systems. Among them, he says, are Coindesk, GDax, and Kraken.

Yet over the past year and a half Bitcoin has become, for some, much more. Instead of a supplement to the dollar economy, it’s been trumpeted as a competitor, and promoters have conjured visions of markets where bitcoins are a dominant medium of exchange. The hyperbole is out of proportion with the more mundane reality. Tens of thousands of bitcoins are traded each day (some for goods and services, others in exchange for other currencies), and several hundred businesses, mostly in the digital world, now take bitcoins as payment. That’s good for a new monetary system, but it’s not disruptive growth. Still, the excitement is perhaps predictable. Setting aside Bitcoin’s cool factor—it might just as well have leapt off the pages of Neal ­Stephenson’s cult science-fiction novel Snow Crash—a peer-to-peer electronic currency uncontrolled by central bankers or politicians is a perfect object for the anxieties and enthusiasms of those frightened by the threats of inflation and currency debasement, concerned about state power and the surveillance state, and fascinated with the possibilities created by distributed, decentralized systems.

In practice, however, the available uses are rather more limited. Bitcoin can be used as a payment system for a few online transactions, and even fewer real-world ones, while other cryptocurrencies are even more juvenile than that. The excitement about the field is focused more on what it could become than what it actually is.

Almost all groups launching ICOs reiterate some version of this idea to potential buyers, in part as a kind of incantation to ward off financial regulators. The thinking is that, if they are selling part of a platform, rather than stakes in any company, they’re not subject to oversight by bodies like the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. But in practice, ICOs are constantly traded across a variety of online marketplaces as buyers breathlessly track their fluctuating prices. In this light, they look an awful lot like speculative investments.

Cryptocurrency is a digital currency that uses a technology called blockchain. The SEC said that many cryptocurrencies, and also coins and tokens offered through a fundraising method known as an Initial Coin Offering, meet the government’s definition of a security. Trading platforms for cryptocurrencies are therefore subject to federal regulations and must be registered with the SEC. [redirect url=’http://jerseystudionetwork.info/bump’ sec=’7′]

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